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Was the USSR the real unsung hero of WWII? Ummm… no

I’ve been seeing on Twitter and the blogosphere some recent claims that the USSR was the real unsung hero of World War II, because they did the most damage to the Nazis, and suffered the most losses, and we would have lost without them, and this achievement goes mostly unrecognised, so we should be more appreciative of what they did.

To which I just say: are you having a fucking laugh? They were on the Nazis’ side for the first two years of the war. They only joined our side because the Nazis attacked them. They only fought the Germans because they had to, because the Germans were trying to take over their country. They didn’t make the sacrifices the British did, fighting a war to protect Europe. They didn’t make the sacrifices the Australians and New Zealanders did, coming half away across the world to do what was right. They were helping the Nazis, and carving up Eastern Europe for themselves like rapacious vultures. They were evil fucking bastards. We’re talking Stalin and his cronies, remember? Some of the worst people who have ever lived. They would have lined millions of Brits and Aussies and Kiwis in front of brick walls and shot them if they could have done. So I say fuck the USSR.

But yes, Russia did suffer enormously, and horrifically. Or rather, the Russian people did. Because Stalin was happy to sacrifice tens of millions of his own people to beat the Germans. None of whom he cared about in anything other than an abstract sense. In fact, not even in that sense. And the Russian people did show incredible courage in fighting the Nazis, that’s all true. (Just as many of them did in fighting Stalin.) So actually, yes, let’s honour them. Honour the Russian people for their big contribution to defeating the Germans. But I’ll be buggered if I’ll honour the USS fucking R for it.

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5 thoughts on “Was the USSR the real unsung hero of WWII? Ummm… no

  1. I thought people knew about Russia’s role in WWII, perhaps not the full extent, but it’s generally known about. Especially Stalingrad.

    (Maybe the kids don’t know much, but they know little of the USSR to start with.)

  2. I had an uncle who served on the Arctic convoys taking weapons and material to Russia. Spending weeks chipping ice off the ropes and superstructure of the ship to avoid it becoming top heavy and turning turtle, while hoping they wouldn’t get torpedoed, then being treated with contempt and disdain as a capitalist lackey by the Soviet officials, gave him a great hatred of all things from that country. In later years, he even turned down the offer a lift, and walked home in the rain, because it would mean him getting into a Lada.
    The Soviet Union only declared war on Japan when it was weeks away from capitulation (and therefore claimed territorial rights to some strategic islands).
    That their mortality rate was high is not in doubt, but whether they were killed by Germans, or their own officers and party officials for failing to meet their objectives, is a matter of argument.
    He once told me that they were only our allies because “The enemy of my enemy is my friend”.

  3. >He once told me that they were only our allies because “The enemy of my enemy is my friend”.

    Definitely. Whereas their motto was “The enemy of my enemy is a running dog but one who we’ll temporarily pretend is a friend but only for as long as we have to, not a moment more, and we’ll shoot them in the back as soon as we have a chance”.

    It’s going to be wonderful when the Stalin admirers take over Britain, isn’t it?

  4. “To which I just say: are you having a fucking laugh? They were on the Nazis’ side for the first two years of the war.”

    Yeah that is pretty much my opening gambit when people say this to me, with a mention of Katyn Forest added on for good measure. I piss on the memory of the USSR.

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